As it is Mother’s Day, what does the Church teach about Mary, as Mother of God?

05-14-2017Catholic Church Q and A

The Church sees Mary as the historical mother for God’s entrance into the world as her child Jesus in the flesh, flesh of her flesh. This person, Jesus, is the Word (God) made flesh (John 1:14). Therefore, if Jesus is God, then Mary is the mother of God. We would say that in an earthly view, that God’s Son came to her to be born in the flesh, even to be a holy embryo, but that the Holy Spirit introduced the Word made flesh into her womb, and it was not by a man. We do not say that Mary existed as the Eternal Son’s mother in Heaven, as God is only Father/Son and Spirit. Yet when Mary received the Lord into her womb, she became the Mother of God, as in receiving the Christ and Lord in her womb for us all—in Him Who would save us all (including Mary).

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“What is the Passover Lamb? How is Jesus our Passover Lamb?”

04-09-2017Catholic Church Q and A

First, it was the memorial of the Exodus, Second, in Jesus, it is Him as Sacrifice, Eucharist, Salvation for us. The Passover lamb was the animal God directed the Israelites to use as a sacrifice in Egypt on the night God struck down the firstborn sons of every household (Exodus 12:29). This was the final plague God issued against Pharaoh, and it led to Pharaoh releasing the Israelites from slavery (Exodus 11:1). After that fateful night, God instructed the Israelites to observe the Passover Feast as a lasting memorial (Exodus 12:14).

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In the Old Testament, it refers to Saturday as being the Sabbath, and in the New Testament Gospels it shows Jesus and His disciples observing the Sabbath, although they change it in some ways (i.e. Jesus ‘works’ miracles on it). Yet, as the Church is begun, at Pentecost, they go to Sundays as the day of rest or “Sabbath.” Why so? Is Saturday not the holy day anymore?

04-02-2017Catholic Church Q and A

Part 3 of 3 answers

The early Church did not move the Sabbath from Saturday to Sunday. Instead “The Sabbath, which represented the completion of the first creation, has been replaced or, maybe better said, renewed by Sunday. The Sunday Lord’s Day recalls the new creation inaugurated by the Resurrection of Christ” (CCC 2190). Sunday is the day Catholics are bound to keep, with vigil included.

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In the Old Testament, it refers to Saturday as being the Sabbath, and in the New Testament Gospels it shows Jesus and His disciples observing the Sabbath, although they change it in some ways (i.e. Jesus ‘works’ miracles on it). Yet, as the Church is begun, at Pentecost, they go to Sundays as the day of rest or “Sabbath.” Why so? Is Saturday not the holy day anymore?

03-26-2017Catholic Church Q and A

Part 2 of 3 answers. In a whole other line of answering the above question, from how we did last Sunday, it is important to understand, too, how the obligation to set aside time for worship is part of the natural law that is binding on everyone. Not all of the laws found in the Old Testament are part of the natural law, and those which are not part of the natural law – e.g., the obligation to worship on Saturday – were only ever binding on the Jews. It is a religious law for Jews. Christians are not bound by them. Since Jesus was resurrected from the dead on Sunday, it made sense for Christians to set aside Sunday for worship. He arose on a Sunday, and He met them again on a Sunday following, and Pentecost indeed was a Sunday, too. The pattern began, and the Sabbath was always under Jesus’ Lordship anyway (recall His words at the protests made against Him doing miraculous works on the Sabbath, but now Jesus brings a new covenant with its miracle of The Covenant of Christ—His own Body and Blood. Covenant worship by Christians now had its new day; those Jews who did not accept Christ stayed with their Saturday worship and observances – and you could tell apart them (and still now) of who was with Jesus and who was not by what holy day was kept.

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In the Old Testament, it refers to Saturday as being the Sabbath, and in the New Testament Gospels it shows Jesus and His disciples observing the Sabbath, although they change it in some ways (i.e. Jesus ‘works’ miracles on it). Yet, as the Church is begun, at Pentecost, they go to Sundays as the day of rest or “Sabbath.” Why so? Is Saturday not the holy day anymore?

03-19-2017Catholic Church Q and A

Until Jesus established the New Covenant by His Body and Blood, given purposely at the Jewish Passover, (and enacted from there and then into Good Friday) – the Old Law was in effect. Jesus likely even went to Sabbath prayers in the prior week to His own death on the Cross, so faithful was He to the Jewish life He was born into. Yet the Passover of Jesus marked a new beginning. What was once a remembrance of salvation history of the past (Moses’ and the Exodus) now was a Passover of the new crossing into Salvation brought into fulfillment and the ever-present by Jesus. An Exodus to pass over sin and death was begun in Jesus, with the destination as Glory, in following Him. It would be an invitation for all peoples to be saved, not just the Jews. Thus, the new worship would be not for the old covenant now, or just to the Jews, but it opened for all in Jesus as a new covenant, and now truly people could all “sing a new song unto the Lord.”

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What are the various courses or tracts of studies in theology?

03-12-2017Catholic Church Q and A

A couple of weeks ago we said that knowing God, so as to be loved by God and to love Him, and others – is the high calling of theology. Theology is the study of God, but there are various theological disciplines to study. For example, there is Moral theology, Trinitarian theology, Patristic theology, Liturgical theology, Biblical theology and more, but most important is that of Dogmatic theology. Of course, dogmas are our principles of faith, the unchangeable doctrines that are pronounced by a pope speaking ex cathedra, or in an ecumenical council, which a Catholic Christian is bound by.

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Is Confirmation (and as a Sacrament) mentioned in the Bible?

03-05-2017Catholic Church Q and A

The Sacrament of Confirmation is the reception of the Holy Spirit through the holy unction of chrism and laying on of hands. This is separate from the gift of Baptism as can be seen in the New Testament. We will give two examples from Acts in the New Testament:

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What does the quote mean that “we do not know the benefit of theology without first doing theology?”

02-26-2017Catholic Church Q and A

It simply means that there is a paradox to theology studies. It brings us out of some ignorance of our knowing God, and once one has seriously delved into theology, they realize how little they still know of God (and it leads them to want more). However, this journey of doing theology then makes us more accountable to God for what we now know from the studies and God’s illumination to us.

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What are the four qualities of the Church that she proclaims from her start?

02-12-2017Catholic Church Q and A

"Whoever obeys and teaches these commandments will be called greatest in the kingdom of heaven." Jesus presents two paths for us today: we can break His commandments or obey them. And the result corresponds to our choice. If we decide not to follow God's guidelines, we will not enjoy the fullness of the kingdom of heaven. But if we choose otherwise, eternity will look much brighter for us!

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What are the ‘new dogmas’ of the Church? That is, are we still newly defining God and what our religious truths should be?

02-05-2017Catholic Church Q and A

The truth is, no new dogma is ever promulgated. The Truth has been for a very long time. Jesus defined Himself as the Truth and to testify to the Truth – and He made the final clarity on it. We of the Catholic Church, or any other – have no new news on God or our truth revealed. So, with that said, here is the answer about ‘new dogmas’ not really being a thing.

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